My Experience with the Apple App Store - or why I won’t be writing an iPhone app any time soon

When I got my new iPhone I (obviously) started to look for apps for it.

When looking for apps on the web I found a remote desktop client for the iPhone, they wanted something like $10 for it – an extremely cheap price for a sysadmin tool.

I think a fair price for something like this is at least $50, if my site was down and I didn’t have a choice I would gladly pay, for $25 I would have bought it just in case – for $10 this is a no-brainer.

So I opened the App Store application on my phone, typed “remote desktop” into the search box and there it was – right next to another remote desktop that only costs $2 and a third that’s free.

Obviously I tried the free app first, it works fine so I didn’t buy any of the paid apps.

As a user I may have saved $10 but as a software publisher I’m terrified - If you write an iPhone app the only way to buy your app if from a catalog where it is listed next to ridiculously under-priced and free options.

posted @ Thursday, April 8, 2010 4:35 PM

Comments on this entry:

# re: My Experience with the Apple App Store - or why I won’t be writing an iPhone app any time soon

Left by Brian Kreck at 4/9/2010 7:20 PM

I agree completely, plus you run the chance that apple won't approve your app for distribution. I do like my iPhone, but I'm thinking I will end up on the Android platform.

I'm a web designer / web application developer and enjoy your timer. Thanks!

# re: My Experience with the Apple App Store - or why I won’t be writing an iPhone app any time soon

Left by Ryan at 4/17/2010 1:17 AM

What I take from this is that your deterent is the catalog that

present the options side-by-side.

There are lots of free programs available for Windows that perform

time tracking as well. A search engine will reveal a listing of them

side-by-side in some regard. I tried several of these applications and

settled on yours because I was willing to pay for an application that

was far better than the other applications that I tried.

On the Blackberry, I typically try several apps before settling on one

to purchase. If a paid-for app has some valuable functionality that

differentiates it from the freely available versions, I'm likely to

pay for it.

I guess that I would look at it not from the standpoint of the number

of freely available options, but whether your application will provide

some functionality that the free applications won't offer. I have no

experience marketing software, but I'd assume there are a significant

number of users like myself that are willing to pay a small fee for a

quality application that significantly differentiates itself from the

free version. In this regard, I don't see how marketing an app for the

iPhone is significantly different than marketing an app for the

Windows desktop, with the exception of the presentation in the app

store.

# re: My Experience with the Apple App Store - or why I won’t be writing an iPhone app any time soon

Left by Uday at 4/18/2010 5:44 PM

Btw.. an awesome remote desktop client is Teamviewer. As long as its for personal and not business use, the app and the desktop client software are both free

Your comment:



 (will not be displayed)


 
 
 
Please add 7 and 6 and type the answer here: